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Posts Tagged ‘ transportation ’

Feeling a little…Danish

I spent today almost entirely by myself. The orientation session’s today were for phone set-up and transportation. My phone works, so I didn’t need that, and I feel pretty comfortable getting around now. So all I needed to do was pick up my books for the semester. The train ride there was smooth, and rather empty since it was around 10:30. Ever since I arrived in Denmark, I’ve made sure to be as observant as possible. I read as many signs as I can and try to learn the language. […]

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Goodbye U.S., Hello India (Initial Observations)

I made it! After a very full travel day and a disorientation of my eating and sleeping schedules, I arrived in Bengaluru, India. (NOTE: Bangalore is 11.5 hours ahead of Minneapolis). There are several familiar and nuanced cultural points – I will focus on diet, hospitality, showers, transportation, and communication. 1. Diet From a high level, the Indian diet consists of curries, flat breads, and rice. I relived the Chicken Tikka Masala and Naan experience – this is highly recommended. I also strongly advocate that a daily tea(/coffee) time should […]

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Arriving in Chile

After 3 days of treacherous rain, and minimal activity, it’s a perfect time to reflect on my first few weeks abroad. The first 20 days of my adventures abroad have been amazing and have revolved around a few different things; friendly Chilean people, new friends, public transportation, bread, and rain! Before I left for Vina Del Mar, Chile I was warned of the many creepy, cat calling, “gringo” preying people that I would encounter on a daily basis and I was told how to handle those situations, but to my surprise […]

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Things Danes Do

Danes do a lot of stuff – if I may be so eloquent as to say so. Here is a nice list, compiled by me, with some pretty commonly heard stereotypes (though not common to Americans. Most Americans can’t even locate the country on a map…) and also some things that I have observed and noticed after having been here for a few months. Put them all together and you will know exactly what it feels like to walk around during the day! 1. Danes don’t cross at red lights. […]

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Trippin’ Across Jutland

Hej hej everybody! I have returned from Western Denmark. Copenhageners sometimes make jokes about Jutland because some consider it to be the equivalent of the American boonies. Like…Montana. Or Wyoming. But I have been there and back again and I had a great time. It didn’t feel a whole lot like Montana or Wyoming, though. As I mentioned last time, I was in Kolding & Århus. (In case you are curious, “Å” is the vowel that takes the place of “AA.” So one could say Århus or Aarhus. The Danish […]

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Still in France

Hello all! Just in case you couldn’t tell from the title, I am still in France. Because I’m in school, I’ve really just been living day-to-day and embarking on very minor adventures. In lieu of reciting my daily routine for you all to gloss over, I thought I’d make a list of pros and cons of my experience thus far. For the sake of optimism, I thought I’d list the pros first. Or you can read the cons first, if you’re the type of person who pushes all the carbs […]

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Some Observations

The goal is to assimilate to the Danish lifestyle! (Kind of. Don’t want to forget my rich American [aka European melting pot that does not include Danish] roots.) Fun fact: Danes are really quiet. In many ways. They are not (for the most part) a chatty bunch. They don’t talk on the train. They especially don’t talk in the silent car of the train. In fact, they will shush you – silently – if even open your mouth to talk. Even the train itself is silent. They also don’t really […]

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Its the Small Things

Hello! Its been a week in London so far and I couldn’t be more excited about it! Throughout my time here, I have learned some small differences from the US and also some small victories that I have accomplished! First off, the differences from the US: In England, … they drive on the wrong side of the road (that was a given) but they are also not required to stop for pedestrians, the cars actually have the right of way! It is quite scary crossing the street because not all […]

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Dublin, London, & Paris- Oh My!

After an incredible weeklong trip around the Western loop of Europe, I am finally back at home in Florence. It was an eventful trip, to say the least, traveling from Dublin to London to Paris, and then back home to Italy… We (Megan, Megan, McKenzie, and I) left for Dublin on Thursday night. By the time we arrived we were pretty exhausted, but that didn’t stop us from going out and exploring the city that first night. We checked into our hostel, and immediately went off in search of a […]

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“Because it’s Russia”

So can you believe I’ve been in Russia for about a month now? Time is whipping by so fast. I have to admit that, despite absolutely loving living here, there are so pretty bizarre things I have witnessed here. Whenever I ask a Russian “Why is this happening?” or “That’s allowed here?” or the usual “WTF?!” I always get the same response: This is Russia. I’ve also asked, “Why does Russia have some strange obsession with having crazy artwork on their cars?” And, “Why is there this portrait of Snoop […]

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Classes Have a Way of Shattering the Whole Vacation Feeling

So classes started here in Montpellier today, which was. . . interesting. I had my first integrated class with french students comparing the governments of France and Britain. The class was three (THREE!) hours long, which is something I’ll definitely have to work at getting used to. It’s seriously really hard trying to pay attention to a three-hour lecture, especially when its in another language. By the time I got home tonight I was ready to go to bed, and that was just from attending one class. Joy of joys […]

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Patricia: Culture Shock

02 June 2012: PISSED (drunk) Going out to bars and drinking is a little more expensive in Australia. Drinks cost between 6 and 14 dollars. It’s also a little harder to order drinks since they differ from America. Some of the bars did not know what a whiskey sour was. However, it is still a good time as any and I have to keep in mind that they have a minimum wage of 18 dollars an hour which pays for 2 drinks. It definitely does not feel like a night out […]

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Rose: Le Transport

Bonjour tout le monde! Day four of the MSID Senegal Spring 2012 program and all is well! We have all successfully moved in with our families and are beginning to settle into a rhythm. It is pleasantly warm here, very sunny, a little breezy, and thus a very nice and snowless winter. Today’s blog theme is transportation. To get to school every day, I walk with Vera, another student in the MSID program who lives very close to me, and sometimes my brother Babacar walks with us. Thank goodness Babacar […]

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Max: Transportation Systems

Transportation is something most of us use every day, but notice only when it bothers us or stops working correctly. Every week I take the subway to campus and back and take a local train to visit nearby relatives, but I rarely stop to think about how this wouldn’t be possible at all in Minneapolis because of the lack of reliable rail service and infrastructure. On the occasions that I do stop to think about the transportation I use every day I realize how different the transportation systems in the […]

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Doug: The Kenyan Matatu – public transportation on steroids

It is physically impossible to come to Nairobi and not encounter a matatu. These small privately-owned vans are literally everywhere. From “Jesus Van” to “Cash Money”, they always have creative names. I saw an ad in the newspaper that said “Men are like matatus. If you miss one, another will come right along”. Whether that is true or not for Kenyan men, I’m not quite sure, but as far as matatus go, that’s a pretty accurate description. Whether you are being yelled at from across the street (if you’re an mzungu this happens a lot) […]

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